Headliners

INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL SCHEDULE

The International Student Services Office in conjunction with LASO and International Club is pleased to sponsor International Film Festival. Beginning Sunday February 26 through Thursday March 1 the campus community is invited to view foreign films in SET 215 at 8:00 p.m. each evening.

The schedule is: Sunday, 2/26: “Maria Full of Grace.” Monday, 2/27: “Howl’s Moving Castle.” Tuesday, 2/28: “Le Fabuleux Destin D’Amelie Poulain (Amelie).” Wednesday, 2/29: “Cinema Paradiso.” Thursday, 3/1: “Chinese Box.”

Maria Full of Grace

17-year-old Colombian girl María Álvarez works in sweat shop-like conditions at a flower plantation. Her income helps support her family, including an unemployed sister who is a single mother. María becomes pregnant by a man she does not love. After unjust treatment from her boss she quits work despite her family’s vehement disapproval. On her way to Bogotá to find a new job, she is offered a position as a drug mule. Desperate, she accepts the risky offer, and swallows 62 wrapped pellets of cocaine and flies to New York City with her immature friend Blanca…

Howl’s Moving Castle

Hayao Miyazaki, the Japanese animation director who wowed audiences worldwide with his award-winning film Spirited Away, brings another visually spectacular tale of imagination to the screen. Sophie is an 18-year-old girl who toils in the hat shop opened years ago by her late father. Often harassed by local boys, one day Sophie is unexpectedly befriended by Howl, a strange but flamboyant wizard whose large home can travel under its own power. However, the Witch of the Waste is displeased with Sophie and Howl’s budding friendship, and turns the pretty young woman into an ugly and aged hag…

Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain(Amelie)

One woman decides to change the world by changing the lives of the people she knows in this charming and romantic comic fantasy from director Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

Amelie is a young woman who had a decidedly unusual childhood; misdiagnosed with an unusual heart condition, Amelie didn’t attend school with other children, but spent most of her time in her room, where she developed a keen imagination and an active fantasy life. Her father Raphael had limited contact with her, since his presence seemed to throw her heart into high gear. Despite all this, Amelie has grown into a healthy and beautiful young woman who works in a cafe and has a whimsical, romantic nature…

Cinema Paradiso

Cinema Paradiso offers a nostalgic look at films and the effect they have on a young boy who grows up in and around the title village movie theater.

The story begins in the present as a Sicilian mother pines for her estranged son, Salvatore, who left many years ago and has since become a prominent Roman film director who has taken the advice of his mentor too literally. In the dark confines of the Cinema Paradiso, the boy and the other townsfolk try to escape from the grim realities of post-war Italy. The town censor is also there to insure nothing untoward appears onscreen, invariably demanding that all kissing scenes be edited out. One day, Salvatore saves Alfredo’s life after a fire, and then becomes the new projectionist…

Chinese Box

John is an English journalist who has lived in the city for some time; while in some ways he still feels like an outsider, he’s come to think of Hong Kong as a home and has close friends there. John is also in love with Vivian, a one-time prostitute who now runs a bar owned by her fiancé, Chang. John is struggling with the realization that he can never have Vivian as his own, when he learns that he has leukemia; the British are to give the reins of power back to the Chinese in six months, but John’s doctors tell him he isn’t likely to live long enough to see it happen.

He quits his job and begins wandering the streets, recording his observations of the city on videotape when he meets, a young woman who makes her way selling whatever she can scavenge, and who hides a secret behind the scarves that obscure her face.

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